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Thursday, April 21, 2011

Reimagination in Hollywood

“Re-imagined” is a popular term used in the film industry. It lets audiences know the product is more than a remake; the creators are not following the original closely.
According to www.answers.com
Reimaginings and renovations often contain tongue in cheek references to the original, with characters of the same name and similar concepts, while remaining significantly different from the original.”
In essence, a screenwriter can tap into a popular vein, to create a world without limitations. Thus, making audiences attracted to a specific name fall in love with an all new story.
A few of my favorite re-imaginings include: Alice in Wonderland, Batman Begins, Casino Royale, Sherlock Holmes, Star Trek and the television series Battlestar Galactica.
Some people view these shows as second only to plagiarism and claim Hollywood has no originality. How do you feel about reimagined films? In your opinion, what are some of the best and worst “re-imaginings”?

21 comments:

M Kathy Brown said...

There have been some pretty good ones that have come down the tube...especially the way they handled Star Trek, to introduce the characters to the current generation.

Personally, I thought Batman Begins was done more accurately, more true to the original writing, than the first film release. That would make it a remake-done-better (if there was such a term). Another one that falls into this category would be "True Grit." The "original" with John Wayne wasn't anywhere near as close to the written story as was the latest with Jeff Bridges.

Although the re-imaginings may be fun, I'd say I enjoy what Hollywood is doing to use today's tech to make an oldie into a more accurate depiction of the original writing. But, what can I say...I'm a nonfiction writer.

Mary Aalgaard said...

Hollywood is just as afraid of publishing something original as book publishing houses. If we can use a familiar name over and over and over, people will come. It's annoying. I don't like it. Be original. Sherlock Holmes wasn't Sherlock Holmes at all. That was a fun movie, but a total misnomer.

August said...

You've named some great "re-imaginings." I don't mind those so much as pointless remakes--they're doing Footloose again!

anthony stemke said...

Some are better than others, yes. I agree Sherlock Holmes was name only. It is to the point now that a re-imag tells me the story is not very good, need the original. If it's good enough, shouldn't need to be linked with the original in title.

Ru said...

I kind of love re-imaginings. For every Sherlock Holmes, there's a Battlestar Gallactica. Sometimes great ideas aren't translated well because of technological constraints, which is generally when the re-imagining kicks butt.

Jo Schaffer said...

Let's face it-- most creative works are "reimaginings" of themes or stories done before. How many modern movies are based on classic films, Shakespeare, etc--?
I think they are fine if they can stand on their own and are well done.
Of course new and original work is refreshing and enjoyable too. But some "reboots" (like the more recent Hulk as opposed to the one made several years ago with Eric Bana)--feel like a "do over" because the first try stunk.
Some movies I wish they would do again-- better.
The new Jane Eyre is goooood.

Rekha said...

Well isn't so bad if you get the newer audience interested in a modern version of an older movie they may have never seen....it would be novel for them...but when you mess up Fairytales like they are planning to with Snow White being with the huntsman....I am not sure if would be good or be attempted...

Name: Luana Krause said...

Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't. I agree the Star Trek reimagining was very well done. It was great seeing the characters' backstories and the cool SFX. For me, the new versions of The Chronicles of Narnia are breathtaking. I'm glad they're taking the time to create these magical stories in such lovley detail and remaining true to the spirit of the stories.

Amy Wood said...

Love today's topic. I'm a fan of reimagined works. I love seeing a fresh look on old favorites!

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busy91 said...

What is it they say? There are only like 7 storylines. Reimagined is good, it gives the story a different twist. Nothing wrong with that. Thanks for stopping by my blog today.

Lisa Ricard Claro said...

Re-imagined works are fine with me. In some cases I prefer the re-make to the original. I've heard it said that there are no original ideas, that what makes a difference is our personal voice and the creative spin. The Cinderella story is an old one; but I dearly love the Drew Barrymore movie "Ever After." It is, in essence, a re-imagined Cinderella story, and one that entertains me more than either the French original or the Disney toon.

Josh Hoyt said...

This is cool I also like the word reboot. when talking about movies. It's like the last star trek movie. It has the same characters but it changes them to fit the new movie. Good post.

Carrie said...

Great word choice. I've seen some good re-imagination in theater lately. Shows based on films. Last year I got to work on a show called Brief Encounter from Kneehigh Theater when it was here in the states. It used some scenes from the film but really re-imagined it. It was really cool.
Next summer the theater I work at is doing a musical version of Roman Holiday using Cole Porter music so that feels like re-imagination as well.

Crystal Pistol said...

Love the new Alice in Wonderland.

Hated the latest Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. The original can't be touched!

Samuel said...

I think re-imagined films are good, aslong as they are good films of course and not just carbon copies of the original film itself.

Madeleine said...

Nice way of describing it. Some of them are brilliant :O)

Jason Shaw said...

Good post, I like the first and second and sometimes even the third or fourth imagining of a story. How great it is to see a different take on things, an exploration into a different realm.

Joyce said...

I don't mind the re-imagined films so much, it's the remakes I get tired of . Those definitely feel unoriginal.

Brigitte said...

I think a lot of people take the whole aspect of remakes and re-imagined films too personally. There's a sea of directors out there, and every one of them has a different vision. It's pretty much guaranteed that a remake's going to happen, if the director feels strongly about it and wishes to try at it himself. Like, Tim Burton liked Batman for the characters. He wanted to make Alice in Wonderland to try a different technique. Chris Nolan wanted to make a Batman with minimum CGI and a more realistic approach to the story. J.J.Abrams for the 2009 Star Trek used genius light effects.
I think remakes & re-imagined films are mostly for experimenting, what with new technologies coming up in cinema every once in a while. We can't forget that despite Hollywood, directors are artists. If they want to experiment with something they feel strongly about, I say go ahead. :)

Jessica said...

i didn't care for the new Alice in Wonderland, but i loved Sherlock Holmes. Batman Begins is another favorite.

i welcome re-imaginings, because a fresh perspective and a new pair of eyes can put a wonderful spin on an old tale. (Thanks for visiting my own blog on the A-Z Challenge!)